6R140 Transmission Solenoid Strategy Code - Transmission Digest

6R140 Transmission Solenoid Strategy Code

When replacing solenoids, plan ahead and order the correct band numbers that came out of the transmission in the same location as they came out of.

With the current generation of solenoids and controls, adapting and reprogramming can often be challenging after replacing valve bodies or solenoids, especially in the Ford 6R140. There’s nothing worse than a stubborn vehicle that seems to resist all attempts to get it to shift right after repairs.  The strategy Ford relies on for adaptation in its 6-speed models is fairly unique and effective. But for a successful outcome, you’ve got to be familiar with how that strategy works.  Not following Ford’s repair guidelines could leave you with drivability concerns after the repair.

Many manufacturers require an elaborate sequence of events for the adaptation to complete successfully after resetting the adapts.  This process can fail for a number of reasons, such as the battery charge being incorrect or using the incorrect scan tool.  Ford added more complexity to this process when it introduced bands and strategies. To ensure a quick, painless relearn and a successful overall repair that will leave your customer satisfied every time, Ford’s solenoid strategy must be understood and followed.  

Ford introduced strategy programming with the 6F50N family of transmissions, followed by the 6F35 and 6R80 families.  Older pulse width modulated solenoids needed to pass a very narrow window of performance characteristics, and if they did not, they were scrapped.  Ford and others realized they could lower the cost of producing the solenoids by testing each solenoid and assigning each with a banding number between 1 and 5 (Figure 1) based on their flow characteristics.  

Figure 1 — 6R140 Solenoid Banding Number: The biggest challenge to repairing a 6R140 is complying with the new requirements of the solenoid strategy programming.

The individual banding numbers and their position in the valve body are then matched to a program in the TCM that would compensate for the performance variation of the solenoids.  An algorithm was created to ensure equal pressures were delivered from each solenoid despite their slightly different flow characteristics.  Ultimately, this left Ford with fewer scrapped solenoids and therefore lower production costs

The biggest challenge to repairing a 6R140 is complying with the new requirements of the solenoid strategy programming.  If replacing a single solenoid, the technician should take note of what the band number is, the position in the valve body, as well as whether it is a normally high or low solenoid so it can be replaced with a solenoid of the same characteristics.  Normally high solenoids will have a black plastic snout, while normally low solenoids will have a brown plastic snout.  If this information is not recorded before the valve body is disassembled, it can be obtained using a scan tool by inputting the solenoid strategy and ID numbers.  The 6R140 solenoid body strategy number will be a 13-digit number; the solenoid body ID number will be eight digits (Figure 2).  

Figure 2 — 6R140 Valve Body Tags: The most challenging part of the repair shouldn’t be the adaptation after the repair.  

This information can be found on the tag on the valve body.  If, after the repair, each solenoid was replaced in the same location with the same band number and type, nothing further should need to be done in terms of programming. However, the keep alive memory should be erased, adaptive values should be cleared, and the following adaptive drive cycle should be performed:

  1. Start the engine running at operating temperature.

2. Move the shift selector between Neutral and Reverse, Neutral and Drive, pausing between each position for 4 seconds.  Repeat the pattern at least two more times or until the shift quality is acceptable.

3. Place the transmission into Drive, accelerate at moderate throttle up to 50 mph, brake lightly to a stop.  Repeat the pattern at least two more times or until the shift quality is acceptable.

4. Repeat step 1.

5. Accelerate from a stop to 25 mph, release the throttle, shift the transmission to L range and coast to less than 10 mph.  Repeat the pattern at least two more times or until shift quality is acceptable.

Replacing the valve body assembly with a different, new or remanufactured unit requires a different approach.  The technician must use the solenoid body strategy number and solenoid body ID from the replacement valve body to update the PCM.  Using a Ford scan tool or a J2534 pass-through device, the new solenoid strategy file is uploaded to the TCM.  The adaptive tables need to be cleared next, followed by resetting the transmission keep alive memory.  Lastly, the Ford-specific drive cycle must be performed.

Failure to follow Ford’s guidelines and blindly replacing solenoids with any band number you have in the shop could result in a flare or harsh shift that could take longer than desired for the TCM to learn the new flow characteristics and adapt to a satisfactory shift.  During this lengthy adaptation, the technician runs the risk of damaging the frictions and possibly all the hard work they just put into the unit.

The most challenging part of the repair shouldn’t be the adaptation after the repair.  When replacing solenoids, plan ahead and order the correct band numbers that came out of the transmission in the same location as they came out of.  When replacing entire valve bodies, make sure that you upload the new solenoid strategy file that comes with it.  Following all of these steps will ensure a quicker relearn and a happy customer. 

Jason Larochelle is a Sonnax product support representative. He is a member of the Sonnax TASC Force (Technical Automotive Specialties Committee), a group of recognized industry technical specialists, transmission rebuilders and Sonnax technicians.

You May Also Like

Sherlock Holmes Approach to an AB60 No-Move Situation

The effectiveness in diagnosing automatic transmission malfunctions is an art form. Although there are similarities among the wide varieties of transmissions on the road, each transmission has its own peculiarities. Aside from having mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical hardware systems to contend with, software/programming issues and various vehicle platforms make diagnostics much more difficult.  Using scopes provides

ab60

The effectiveness in diagnosing automatic transmission malfunctions is an art form. Although there are similarities among the wide varieties of transmissions on the road, each transmission has its own peculiarities. Aside from having mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical hardware systems to contend with, software/programming issues and various vehicle platforms make diagnostics much more difficult. 

GM 6T40 Pump Identification Guide

The 6T40 was introduced in 2008 for General Motors front-wheel-drive cars in the Chevrolet Malibu and has gone through several changes throughout its three generations, specifically in the pump area. The 6T40 is closely related to the more lightweight 6T30 and the heavier duty 6T45 and 6T50. Generation one started phasing out during the 2012

Seeing the Forest AND the Trees

They say that the proverbial phrase “I couldn’t see the forest for the trees” means that a person or organization cannot see the big picture because it focuses too much on the details. Related Articles – 4L60E Harsh 1-2 Shift – TASC Force Tips: Diagnosing 8L45 & 8L90 Shift Complaints – TASC Force Tips: Hydraulics

The Manifold Pipeway

The Honda six-speed transmission has been on the bench of many specialty shops for one reason or another (figure 1). But, for those of you who have yet to lay your hands on one, mounted on the upper side of the unit is one of the largest, if not the largest solenoid and pressure switch

8L90 Vacuum Testing

Below are the diagrams for vacuum testing GM 8L90 transmissions. Note: OE valves are shown in rest position and should be tested in rest position unless otherwise indicated. Test locations are pointed to with an arrow. Springs are not shown for visual clarity. A low vacuum reading indicates wear. For specific vacuum test information, refer

Other Posts

The torque converter can of worms: Lockup and aftermarket programming

Lockup torque converters have been around now for some time. They came into production around the time when fuel mileage demands were put into effect by the government, and the auto manufacturers needed to do something to better connect the fluid coupling (torque converter) of the automatic transmission to the motor. By doing this, OEMs

tascfeature-1400
The Subaru mystery burn

The Subaru TR580 transmission is known for having torque converter clutch solenoid failures. An example of this can be seen in Figures 1 (above) and 2 (below). Related Articles – Chrysler RH/RE late shifts and high pressure – Ford 6R80 shift solenoid ‘E’ resistance change: How to tell the difference – Allison 1000 geartrain bind-up

Tech-Speak-May-Figure-1-1400
Kitting keeps us profitable: Aftermarket kit suppliers listing 2024

The kitting of transmission parts has made profitable shop operation possible. When a kit with 100 parts is necessary, a distributor has already assembled all the important components into the kit and it is typically sitting on the shelf ready to be delivered. Kitting saves time and effort for both the shop and the supplying

Watch out for high pressure in GM 8L45, 8L90 valve bodies

Hey now! Oh boy, do I have a fun failure to share with you and warn you about today! Related Articles – How to get around non-serviceable GM 6T70/75 self-tapping pump screws – A part for every need: Hard parts supplier listing 2024 – Ford 8F24 mechanical diode failure Have you encountered a crack in