What the …! - Transmission Digest

What the …!

In essence, this equates to a hydraulic or mechanical problem in the intermediate-clutch circuit, which could mean that once second gear is commanded, the TCM does not see the correct second-gear ratio.
What the …!

Shift Pointers

Subjects: Solenoid failure; replacement of remote transmission filter
Unit: 5R110W
Vehicle Application: Ford pickups
Essential Reading: Rebuilder, Diagnostician, R & R
Author: Pete Luban, ATSG

Shift Pointers

  • Subjects: Solenoid failure; replacement of remote transmission filter
  • Unit: 5R110W
  • Vehicle Application: Ford pickups
  • Essential Reading: Rebuilder, Diagnostician, R & R
  • Author: Pete Luban, ATSG

The title of this article could be your response to a couple of 5R110W issues. The first problem concerns a late-model Ford diesel F-250 that came into the shop storing a P2702, defined as “Transmission Friction Element C Apply Time Range/Performance.” The vehicle also exhibited complaints of a delay into drive (reverse had no delay) and a flared 1-2 shift. The transmission was in limp mode and the Tow/Haul lamp was flashing.

In essence, this equates to a hydraulic or mechanical problem in the intermediate-clutch circuit, which could mean that once second gear is commanded, the TCM does not see the correct second-gear ratio.

The pan contents did not look that bad for the amount of mileage indicated by the vehicle odometer. Since it would be highly unlikely that this could be caused by valve problems (because of the lack of them), and this being a later-model transmission, it did not have an intermediate pressure switch, meaning that the logical place to look next would be the solenoids, since they control shift and clutch-application times.

At a glance everything seemed to be in order, but when the intermediate-clutch solenoid (SSPC-C) was removed from the solenoid body (can’t really call it a valve body), much to the technician’s surprise what he was holding in his hand was what you see in Figure 1.

It seems that the solenoid body and stem had separated (Figure 2), causing a leak in the second-clutch hydraulic circuit and resulting in the P2702 code being stored and the previously mentioned complaints.

In Figure 3, in the area where the stem meets the solenoid body, you can see that the only thing holding the body and stem together is equally spaced crimps.

When I checked some 5R110W solenoids that I had, I found one where, with enough effort, the stem could be pulled out of the solenoid body. It seems to me that when you’re checking these solenoids for wear issues, it would also be a good idea to check the fit of the solenoid body to the stem to ensure that it is tight.

Our next little tidbit concerns the remote transmission filter, or what we call the inline filter, with which these vehicles are equipped to provide additional filtration that the sump filter is not capable of performing.

The first-design filter was a canister-type unit. By removing the canister one could replace the filter element inside, affectionately referred to as “the toilet-paper roll.” This filter design was used from the start of production into the 2006 model year, when it was replaced by the second-design filter assembly (Figure 4). This newer filter is a sealed unit that cannot be serviced and must be replaced.

I’m sure by this point that not many managers in a transmission shop will quote a price for a transmission service without checking prices first. Some filters and special oil, and the labor to service these items, can be pretty pricey.

This new filter assembly, which according to Ford parts info was used on these vehicles starting anywhere from 12-18-06 and continuing to 02-11, is beneath the bellhousing. I do not know why the filter usage stops at 02-11; it may have something to do with the new 6R140 that is coming out with the 2011 model year. The cost to you as of this writing will be $128.02, although I have heard that in some instances you can get it for $80 if you are a good Ford parts customer; the list price is $170.69. This filter assembly carries part number 7C3Z-7B155-B and may have to be ordered;, apparently someone thinks it doesn’t need replacement very often.

One such vehicle came to a shop for a service, and the technician spotted this new-style filter and recommended that it be replaced along with the sump filter on the basis of mileage; there were no drivability issues.

The technician took the time and trouble to cut this filter open – which I’m told was not easy because it is quite thick – and what you see in figures 5 and 6 is the result; looks pretty bad, doesn’t it?

Special thanks to John Finch and the crew at Finch Auto Repair in Independence, La., and a very special thank you to Donald Holliday at Covington Automotive in Covington, La.

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