Sponsored video: Lubegard Seal Fixx multi-system stop leak - Transmission Digest

Sponsored video: Lubegard Seal Fixx multi-system stop leak

In this sponsored video, Lubegard highlights its Seal Fixx multi-system stop leak for worn or dried-out seals. The full script of the video is below:

Lubegard Seal Fixx Multi-System Stop Leak is an industrial strength and cost-effective stop leak that works fast. This unique formula will lubricate and revitalize worn or dried-out seals safely without causing harm to internal components.

Seal Fixx quickly stops seal-related leaks in:

  • Gasoline and diesel engines – including main seals;
  • Power steering systems;
  • Automatic, manual, dual-clutch and CVT transmissions;
  • Differentials; and
  • Industrial and farming applications that require hydraulic fluid such as jacks, tractors, plows and lifts.

Seal Fixx is easy to use and is compatible with all rubber seals and gaskets.

One eight-ounce bottle of Seal Fixx will treat six quarts of fluid. Adjust usage based on the system’s capacity following a treat rate of 1.3 to 1.5 ounces per quart.

To use, bring the system to normal operating temperature. Add the recommended amount of Seal Fixx to the system, making sure that the total volume does not exceed the maximum fill level.

Do not use in brake systems, radiators or fuel tanks.

Seal Fixx is not effective on components that are cracked, torn or excessively damaged. If the leak persists after several hours of operation after applying Seal Fixx, seek professional repair consultation.

For more information and to see the company’s full line of products, visit lubegard.com

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