The effects of supply chain holdup on the transmission industry

The effects of supply chain holdup on the transmission industry

Everyone is aware of the current supply chain issues plaguing our industry and many others. Between a lack of raw materials that affect all rubber/paper and steel products and problems with containers at our ports, these are issues that will continue through Q2 of 2022, if not beyond. This is happening during a time when new cars are unavailable (for similar supply chain issue reasons) and people are holding onto their current vehicles, making it somewhat of a boom time for transmission repair. We felt it was important to look at this issue from a shop’s perspective and see how shop owners are dealing with the repercussions of these parts shortages.

Through our conversations with shop owners and rebuilder executives, it became clear that there is an immense domino effect placed on shops once specific parts or materials become unavailable or delayed.

“Parts that were same-day or 24 hours away are now several days,” said Pat Sepe, owner of Dial Transmission in Merrick, NY. “Therefore, the movement of vehicles off our lifts has set our scheduling and completion of repairs back several days. This means vehicles waiting to be worked on are being delayed.”

“I inform customers of the problems in shipping and delivery of parts,” said Rich Dodzik of Avon Transmission in Avon, IN. “[I explain] that this will delay the delivery of their car in a somewhat timely manner.”

There is also extraordinary pressure put on shop owners to change tried and true methods of serving their customers in an attempt to keep jobs turning around in a timely manner.

“I use multiple parts houses including OEs,” said John Parmenter, owner of Centerreach Trans on Long Island. “I spend about two hours a day sourcing parts now.”

Many builders now concur that availability of parts now outweighs the price.

“We use every resource for parts available to us,” said Sepe. “We need to move vehicles in and out, and the customer has to absorb the cost.” Sepe stated that he is “checking on price increases daily.”

 “Unless there is an outrageous price increase, the quote I give [customers] stands,” Dodzik said. “They will be informed if anything changes.”

Some shop owners are turning to reman units when parts are unavailable for a specific  job.

“We do use reman units when there is a time factor in getting parts,” Dodzik said. “Or if the shop is backlogged in the building area.”

“I would use a reman in a pinch,” Parmenter said, “when I have cars backed up.”

Many shops are buying any parts that are available and stocking them in an effort to anticipate jobs that may come in the door. While this may have a “boom effect” for distributors, eventually it will have to level out.

While all the shop owners we spoke to say that they are kept informed of parts issues from their distributors, they all agreed that they have had to go above and beyond to find needed parts, even using dealerships and local auto parts stores for items.

The “any port in a storm” mentality has served all shops during this time.

“Whoever gets the parts here first,” is who will be used for any specific, hard-to-find part, added Sepe.

You May Also Like

Back with force: ATSG is back in full swing to educate the transmission industry

“Everywhere you turned, there was something amazing. It’s probably the coolest man cave I’ve ever been in,” says Wayne Colonna who, as president, heads up the technical team at the Automatic Transmission Service Group (ATSG). Wayne is describing the host venue for his company’s inaugural 2024 seminar that was held at the John Force Racing

“Everywhere you turned, there was something amazing. It’s probably the coolest man cave I’ve ever been in,” says Wayne Colonna who, as president, heads up the technical team at the Automatic Transmission Service Group (ATSG). Wayne is describing the host venue for his company’s inaugural 2024 seminar that was held at the John Force Racing facility and museum in the Los Angeles suburb of Yorba Linda, California. Transtar’s Orange, CA branch served as the presenting host for the event.

Ford 8F35 maintenance tips: Planetary failure and no-pressure conditions

Our shop has had several vehicles come in with the Ford 8F35 transmission having planetary failure. Apparently, there was a run where the pinion needle bearings had a hardness problem (see Figure 1). Related Articles – Don’t fear customer complaints about CVTs – 2024 State of the Powertrain Industry – Powertrain industry directory and buyer’s guide

Figure 12.
Don’t fear customer complaints about CVTs

Continuously Variable Transmissions, or CVTs, are more common than you think. Audi, Subaru, Nissan, Ford, GM and many other automakers use CVT transmissions in cars and SUVs. There is no way to avoid them. Chances are there is one in your shop right now. Related Articles – Shift Pointers: A Chrysler 300 no-shift complaint –

CVT-Transmission-2
2024 State of the Powertrain Industry

The Transmission Digest Annual Survey of Retail Shops has served as benchmark and planning tool for the industry now for the past 38 years. Charts and tables in this study are based on a survey of subscribers that was conducted early this year.  Related Articles – Kitting keeps us profitable: Aftermarket kit suppliers listing 2024

state-on-industry-feature-1400
Powertrain industry directory and buyer’s guide 2024

This is the latest in TD’s annual series of directories for the powertrain industry. Companies that supply products to the powertrain aftermarket are listed in alphabetical order. Because data changes frequently, only organizations that have updated information with Transmission Digest in the recent past are included. Related Articles – Top 20 Tools and Products: The Winners – Performance

Powertrain-Industry-Directory

Other Posts

Going the extra mile: Proving your transmission repair suspicions

A 2003 Honda Pilot with a five-speed three-shaft transmission came into our shop with a customer concern that the vehicle had no power, and the “D” light was flashing. I first did a scan for codes to see what it came up with, and the scan tool returned four DTCs: P1298 (ELD voltage high), P0135 (H02S

RRfeature-1400
Diagnosing Ford 10R60, 10R80 and 10R140 series speed sensor issues

Ford 10-speed 10R series transmissions utilize four two-wire, Hall-effect sensors — TSS, ISSA, ISSB and OSS — for providing speed signals to PCM or TCM. They are supplied nine volts by a PCM or TCM and assist in the control of clutch apply/release timing that is used in determining shift quality, including TCC. Related Articles

Jatco JF613E transmission quick reference material

For those working on the Jatco JR613E transmission, a widespread transmission with plenty of applications, the following should be a helpful guide. Related Articles – Outgrowing the walls: The story of EVT Transmission Parts – Spotting different 68RFE designs through the years to avoid issues – Valve body and component suppliers: A comprehensive list Domestic

Complete the 2024 transmission shop survey for a chance to win a gift card

Every year, Transmission Digest conducts the Retail Shop Survey. This survey will take five minutes or less. The results of this survey will appear in the March edition of our Powertrain Bulletin email newsletter, and should serve as a valuable benchmark for your business. Your responses will be kept confidential and reported only in the