Hyundai Archives - Transmission Digest
Simple fixes for bad battery connections

In this article we will discuss bad connections, starting with the battery and ending with, well, the battery. Seemingly every week, we at Certified Transmission get a vehicle in that has an issue at the battery terminals; and if it isn’t causing an issue right now, it will sooner or later. All the following cars

Alto introduces new Hyundai/Kia solenoid

Alto has introduced a new line of Hyundai/Kia new OEM Pressure Solenoids (model number 212502), for model years 2009 to present. Models covered include: 6 Speed Models: A6GF1, A6MF1/2, A6MF2H, A6LF28 Speed Models: A8TR1, A8LF1

212502_Alto-600
KIA A6MF2H Hybrid Engine Stalls in Drive

Complaint: A 2012 Kia Optima Hybrid equipped with a 2.4L engine and the A6MF2H transmission has a complaint of the engine stalling as soon as the shifter is pulled into the drive position. When the transmission was disassembled for inspection, the engine clutch friction plates were found to be burnt and welded together, refer to

Hyundai/KIA A5HF1 (F5A51) Binds in Reverse, No 4th Gear

Complaint: After overhaul, a Hyundai or Kia equipped with the A5HF1 (F5A-51) transmission binds up in reverse range and does not have fourth gear. Cause: The Failsafe Valve “B” keeper fell out of the valve body unnoticed, refer to figure 1. That will allow the valve and sleeve to move out far enough to create

Hyundai/KIA A8LR1 P0841

A 2012 Hyundai Genesis equipped with the A8RL1 eight-speed transmission (figure 1) has an original complaint of harsh reverse engagement, harsh 2-3 and 4-5 upshift and a neutralization condition. Since parts for this transmission were not readily available and an aftermarket remanufactured transmission could not be found, a Hyundai factory remanufactured transmission was installed. After

Hyundai/Kia Torque Converter Clutches

Alto Products Corp. has announced four new one-sided friction clutch plates for the Hyundai/Kia A6LF1/2/3, A5HF1, and A6GF1 Torque Converters. Alto p/n 213714A and 213716A (A6LF1/2/3) feature the company’s G3 friction material, which is engineered to be durable for high-performance and converter applications. Alto p/n 213718A and 213720A (A5HF1, A6GF1) feature K2 high-energy friction material, designed for many different

Erratic & Harsh Shifts: A Part Update

A 2012 Hyundai Sonata using a 2.4L engine and an A6MF2 transmission comes in to Covington Automotive with erratic and harsh shifts. When the vehicle was scanned for codes, transmission-fluid temperature-sensor codes P0711 and P0713 were stored. P0711 is a rationality check code while P0713 is a circuit high- input code.

Hyundai/Kia 6-Speed Automatic Transmissions: Part 1

Although Hyundai was not the first manufacturer to offer a six-speed automatic transmission, they ultimately made up for lost time. In 2009 the car company released a series of six-speed transmissions to accommodate a wide range of Hyundai and Kia applications. The transmissions can be FWD or AWD and are rather compact in design. There are three basic levels or sizes that can overlap vehicle models and engine displacements.

IMA (Integrated Motor Assist)

In an effort to improve fuel economy, drivability, durability, and cost, many changes have occurred to automatic transmissions over time. In the last decade however, the proliferation of new models has been unending. Step-type transmissions have ratcheted up the gearing from old-time three- and four-speeds to five- through seven-speeds.

Dealing with Shift Adaptations

Shift adaptations are something we have to deal with in the transmission industry. More and more car manufacturers are making use of this function to keep their transmissions shifting like new as they wear. Part of the function of adaptation is to allow the transmission control module (TCM) to compensate for the gradual wear of clutches and bands and for internal hydraulic leaks resulting from use.

A Tale of two Hyundais

We recently received a call from one of our wholesale customers that had bought a carry-out transmission for a 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe. The vehicle had been out for a few months and was returned to the installer with a complaint of slipping shifts. Our customer had driven the vehicle and verified the complaint, removed the transmission and called us to send a replacement. At this point with the transmission already removed there was not much we could check so we sent out a replacement transmission.

Resetting Hyundai Shift Adapts, and Procedures for Relearning

Like most late-model vehicles, Hyundai vehicles need the shift adapts cleared and then relearned to get a properly working transmission after overhaul or valve-body replacement. Some Hyundai vehicles can have the shift adapts cleared by disconnecting the battery, connecting the positive and negative battery cables and turning on the headlights for 10 minutes; others need a scan tool to clear the shift adapts. The chart in Figure 1 shows which vehicles need a scan tool and which can be cleared by the battery-disconnect process. All Hyundai models not shown in Figure 1 need a scan tool to clear the shift adapts.