September 2011 Archives - Transmission Digest
Solenoid-Pack Information for the Chrysler 62TE

The 62TE is a transmission that you will be seeing in your shop soon. It was first used in 2007 in the Chrysler Sebring with the 3.5L engine and the Pacifica with the 4.0L engine, and in 2008 it was used in the minivans with the larger 3.8L and 4.0L engines. This six-speed transmission is still being used today.

The 62TE solenoid pack is made up of six shift solenoids, one line-pressure solenoid, a temperature sensor and five pressure switches. The pressure switches are just like the ones in a 604 solenoid pack.

Overheated Honda Converters/740 Codes

Overheated Honda converters have become a living nightmare for many transmission and torque-converter shops, one that has lingered way too long because of the many misconceptions and missteps during the problem-solving process. The blame game has gone back and forth, but the torque-converter rebuilders have been receiving most of the criticism.

Volkswagen DSG 02E: A simple fix for a solenoid problem

With the increase in manufacturers forcing the purchase of subcomponent replacements rather than enabling you to buy only what you need, it’s great to get a break every once in a while. Such is the case with Volkswagen’s 02E Direct Shift Gearbox. The solenoids mounted on the valve body are not available individually, so if you needed just one solenoid you would have to buy the entire Mechatronic assembly (valve body, solenoids and TCM) for about a thousand bucks.

Corvettes: Easy to Service?

I have been reporting on serviceability of motor vehicles from the viewpoint of a technician for many years now. I normally pick a car, truck, van or SUV that sells 100,000 or more units per year – cars you will almost certainly see in your service bay.

Corvette is not in that category, but every boy or girl growing up after WWII remembers a Corvette as the coolest car in the world. They certainly have a mystique about them that made many of us, at some point in our lives, want to buy or at least get behind the wheel of one. But when they need service or repairs, do the technicians love ’em or hate ’em?

Modern Transmissions & Vehicle Security: Where is the TCU?

Engine-management computers have moved from the passenger compartment to under the hood to the top of the engine to reduce wiring (copper) and assembly costs in vehicles. Many of you may have seen manufacturers even begin to place the transmission control unit (TCU) inside the transmission (Figure 1). I am not aware who was first to use this technology, but I have seen it for many years on Mercedes-Benz vehicles.

Statistics – Who Needs Them?

You do, but only if you aspire to a higher level of success. It’s amazing how some business owners count very heavily on statistics but others rarely, if ever, look at their numbers.

It Is a Brand-New Part; Why Do I Have to Check It?

There are many causes for comebacks in the units our industry rebuilds. Some problems result from human error, other factors outside the unit can affect proper performance, or the new parts that were installed can create issues.

Simple Wire Problems

Wow, what a treat I was in for. I brought the Buick into the shop later that day to perform the preliminary checks and noticed that the information center flashed AWD DISABLED, and the message remained on through the entire check-out and road test. I instantly agreed with the customer that this was “bothersome,” to say the least, not really even caring whether the all-wheel drive worked. Just this annoying message on the instrument panel was enough to make a person not want to drive the car, a distraction from an otherwise nice drive.

September 2011 Issue

In This Issue
Mitsubishi 3000GT: Sport Lamp flashing
Nissan/Infiniti RE4F04B: No upshift; DTC P0720 may be stored
BMW/Jaguar ZF 5HP24: Failure of A-clutch drum
Nissan/Infiniti RE4F04B: Engine stalls during acceleration from a stop