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Automatic Transmission

Another Transmission Mutation – Part 1

In the never-ending variety of transmissions on the road today, there is yet another that may find its way onto your bench. A mutation from the F4A40-series transmission used in Mitsubishi and Hyundai vehicles, it’s called the A4CF2 (Figure 1). This is a four-speed transmission (Figure 2) being used in 2006 and later Kia Spectras and 2007 and later Hyundai Elantra (HD).

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Technically Speaking

  • Subject: Design and operation
  • Unit: A4CF2
  • Vehicle Applications: 2006-up Kia Spectra, 2007-up Hyundai Elantra
  • Essential Reading: Rebuilder, Diagnostician
  • Author: Wayne Colonna, ATSG, Transmission Digest Technical Editor

In the never-ending variety of transmissions on the road today, there is yet another that may find its way onto your bench. A mutation from the F4A40-series transmission used in Mitsubishi and Hyundai vehicles, it’s called the A4CF2 (Figure 1). This is a four-speed transmission (Figure 2) being used in 2006 and later Kia Spectras and 2007 and later Hyundai Elantra (HD).

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By viewing the clutch-application chart in Figure 2, you will see that it is as if you were looking at a later F4A40-series application chart using a one-way-clutch; underdrive, overdrive and reverse clutches; and low/reverse and 2/4 clutches.

And just as the F4A40-series transmission is good about providing clutch-pressure taps, so is the A4CF2 (figures 3, 4 and 5).

Figure 6 lists specifications.

Where this transmission deviates from the F4A40 series is that the valve body and solenoids are attached to the bottom of the transmission rather than on its side.

Figure 7 is a view of the solenoid case connector with each terminal numbered and identified.

In Figure 8, you see the valve body with the pan and filter removed and the pressure-control solenoid and TFT sensor in full view.

Before you can remove the valve body to view all the remaining solenoids, you will need to unplug the mounted solenoid-harness manifold (Figure 9) and unbolt it from the valve body (Figure 10).

With the valve body removed (Figure 11), all the remaining solenoids become accessible, and I have identified each of the solenoids to assist in diagnostics.

To further assist in any future diagnostics, see Figure 12 for case-passage identification should you need to inspect the integrity of a specific internal circuit.

In Part 2 we will look into the valve body to help you in making repairs, as the manufacturer does not make this information easily available.

Many thanks to Robbie and the good folks at Alto Products for the use of this transmission, making this article possible.

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